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Hope & Despair at my 18th Full Marathon and 5th Milo Marathon


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At the starting line with Dennis & Van…

A timer and a 4:00 pacelet (c/o Alfred Delos Reyes ) guided me throughout my journey where I slowed down when I felt I was going too fast and vice versa (180 steps/minute only c/o Scott J.) The last 4 nights before the race, I was waking up at 3 am and reading for an hour Scott Jurek’s Eat & Run so most of my inspiration came from that book.  Among them:  maintaining my forefoot strikes which are the most efficient since it uses the elasticity of the Achilles tendon and the arch of the foot.  Thus, less energy is lost.  Foot should be landing slightly in front of one’s center of mass.  Also, I should be breathing abdominally using just the nose – which was quite difficult, really.

By KM 32 (3:01), I was over by 1 minute which isn’t bad since my qualifying time was at 4:10 – I just wanted to have enough time when the inevitable started.

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running is controlled falling

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so far, so good

 

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It went full throttle after the final turn around in Tramo. After KM32, I was forcing myself to keep moving but the cramping would suddenly stab me from behind and I was reduced to stopping and losing a bit of balance (I felt like Moses with my arms out and trying to part Roxas blvd.). Thankfully, there were kind-hearted runners to support me from falling and after a few seconds I’d get going. Many offered to help me sit by the sidewalk but that wasn’t in the plan. I was thinking of Scott doing the Hardrock100 with a broken ankle and I was flying (more of jogging, really).  I had to also remember even in moments of desperation, to keep my posture proper – shoulders behind and arms bent 45 degrees at the elbow.  I had to also lean a bit forward but not at the hips so the body is still one straight line.

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5 kilometers into the finish and already beyond my target qualifying time, the major hardening disappeared so I slugged it out without awakening the major cramping. I was thinking of running through thin ice or hot coals so the steps were light and fleeting – a bit slow but it burned the miles. I didn’t want the same episode last year of a cramping finish so a 4:30 wasn’t so bad. Quite happy that I wasn’t grimacing at the last 200 meters (where photographers abound) and was taking in all the good vibes from the crowd

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the final struggle…

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whew, finally made it!

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no more, that’s it. I’m no longer running…

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My Milo experience (5:49, 4:52, 4:24, 4:36) hasn’t always been my best but I vow to keep coming back even into my 60s (when my QT has reached 4:30 hehe). Now that’s one vow I will keep. My profuse gratitude to Coach Jim Saret & Toni Saret and my MARRS (Milo Apex R2 Running School) running family for making our 3-month training lotsa fun, informative and competitive. Thanks to Jonel C Mendoza for all the tips (1 GU ever 45 minutes). Now where the hell do I buy those salt sticks?

Capturing my moments of ecstacy and agony were the Running Photographers (Pido), Dennis Centeno, Flat Ironman, Lakbay Buhay, Run Lipa & the Official Milo Marathon photographers (Dhona Castillo).